Beating The Odds – A New Approach to Betting on casino game

Beating The Odds – A New Approach to Betting on casino game

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Casino Visions and Caviar Dreams

Most of us have heard this before: “I’m going to get rich this weekend. I’m feeling lucky. I’m going to triple this money I have. It was set aside for the mortgage, but I know I’m going to win. I can feel it. I was so close last time.”

It’s beyond cliché. It’s a cultural phenomenon, with the optimistic playing the part of financial lemmings, eager to swim out in the ocean too far to swim back to shore (or in this case solvency).

The people who go to casino’s with such a “plan” usually end up leaving with their tail between their legs.

Casino towns are money siphons, an instant asset  แอพคาสิโน  reallocation strategy for the hopeful. For every sensible vacationer who takes a preset allotment of discretionary income to a gaming community for some kicks and a show, there is a reckless gambling addict hurtling toward destitution. The trick, as the song said, is to never play the game too long.

So, according to the industry, you can rely on the lady luck long shot, the win some-lose more method long endorsed by the gaming community, or inflict upon yourself the relative tedium of card counting.

What other options are there for the gaming enthusiast looking for a sincere chance to beat the house advantage?

There is, some say, a formula.

In today’s computer culture, advanced mathematical calculations are just an app away. Computation professionals are driving technology further, faster.

Is it really surprising that in an era where the numerics of card counting have tipped the scale in blackjack, to have another contender emerge and challenge the notion that the odds always favor the house?

This has indeed happened. It comes from France. It is called the Martingale method, and was considered high tech… by eighteenth century nobility.

The system revolves around the fundamental principal of doubling your bet each time you lose until you win.

The theory is that you are bound to get one right eventually, and you then will get the payoff you pursued in the initial wager.

One interesting point about this method is that at first glance the wagerer appears to be a gambling addict on a bender. Upon closer inspection, what looks like unstable behavior shows itself to be the execution of a discipline within the chaos of wagering. It can pay.

The method practitioner must have researched the technique and learnt the entire formula, which can be fully understood in hours armed with nothing more than elementary school math.

So far so good. The rub? One had better know their game. Losses get expensive quickly. A wagerer could be risking $16 to win the $1 they set out to win. If the first bet was large, the risks can be disproportionate.

Where does this lead the hopeful wagering enthusiast who is not a card counter in possession of a substantial bankroll? This is the dead end. Or is it?

Hiring A Ringer

One can try the internet sports pickers. Called “touts,” these people are willing to do the analyses (thinking) for you.

Touts study a sport or sports, and one pays them for their expertise. Upon swiping your card, the “expert” bestows upon you their predictions, ranging in time from a day to a year.

Touts do not gamble for you. They don’t make wagers: only predictions.

The tout business is competitive, and if you do more than peruse their adverts there are a few things of which you should be aware. First, it is rumored that some of these touts don’t exist as an actual person, but are instead marketing gimmicks.

As I investigated this book, a controversy was brewing about an invented tout with the last name Chan, whose character was allegedly created to appeal to a certain demographic. How could this happen? Touts are often organized into groups. Tout houses are arranged so prospective clients can elect a soothsayer that aligns with prospect preferences.

The more diversified the choices, the more likely a prospective client is to find kinship through familiarity with one of the choices.

Not having a matching demographic option, wouldn’t it make sense for the marketing arm of such an organization to develop as many choices as possible? What if the creation of such a character was the best available option? Is it lying or promotional enhancement?

In any event this forum, like every casino ville, may not be exactly what it seems.

When employing touts, another aspect/gimmick of which you should be aware is the star rating system. Touts diversify their picks between 1 and 5 stars (5 being preferred). The star ratings are meant to establish the confidence level a tout has on a prediction.

For example, say a tout believes one team should beat another, but hasn’t much confidence, that pick would be given one star. Should the tout feel assured about a selection, the pick would receive a rating of 5 stars. Two through 4 stars implies a marginal degree of confidence in the selection.

When one looks at an advert where a tout says they have won six 5 star picks in a row, that doesn’t mean they’ve done the same with their picks made from 1 to 4 stars.

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